Dictionary.com

baccalaureate

[ bak-uh-lawr-ee-it, -lor- ]
/ ˌbæk əˈlɔr i ɪt, -ˈlɒr- /
Save This Word!

noun
a religious service held at an educational institution, usually on the Sunday before commencement day.
QUIZ
QUIZ YOURSELF ON HAS VS. HAVE!
Do you have the grammar chops to know when to use “have” or “has”? Let’s find out with this quiz!
Question 1 of 7
My grandmother ________ a wall full of antique cuckoo clocks.
Meet Grammar CoachWrite or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar helpImprove Your Writing
Meet Grammar CoachImprove Your Writing
Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar help

Origin of baccalaureate

1615–25; <Medieval Latin baccalaureātus, equivalent to baccalaure(us) advanced student, bachelor (for baccalārius (see bachelor), alteration by association with Latin phrase bacca laureus laurel berry) + -ātus-ate1

OTHER WORDS FROM baccalaureate

post·bac·ca·lau·re·ate, adjective

Words nearby baccalaureate

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use baccalaureate in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for baccalaureate

baccalaureate
/ (ˌbækəˈlɔːrɪɪt) /

noun
the university degree of Bachelor or Arts, Bachelor of Science, etc
an internationally recognized programme of study, comprising different subjects, offered as an alternative to a course of A levels in Britain
US a farewell sermon delivered at the commencement ceremonies in many colleges and universities

Word Origin for baccalaureate

C17: from Medieval Latin baccalaureātus, from baccalaureus advanced student, alteration of baccalārius bachelor; influenced in folk etymology by Latin bāca berry + laureus laurel
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
FEEDBACK