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allyship

[ al-ahy-ship ]
/ ˈæl aɪˌʃɪp /
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noun
the status or role of a person who advocates and actively works for the inclusion of a marginalized or politicized group in all areas of society, not as a member of that group but in solidarity with its struggle and point of view and under its leadership:Genuine allyship does not come with special recognition—we do not get awards for confronting issues people have to live with every day.
the relationship or status of persons, groups, or nations associating and cooperating with one another for a common cause or purpose:In 1943, fearing that earlier racist immigration laws would hinder allyship with China in the war against Japan, the U.S. passed legislation allowing 105 Chinese immigrants per year.
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Origin of allyship

First recorded in 1845–50; ally + -ship
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use allyship in a sentence

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